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You are here:Home>>Items filtered by date: June 2020
 
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AllAfrica News: Latest
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  • Sudan: Peace Process - Patience Is Required for the Long Road Ahead
    [The Conversation Africa] "End the wars" and "peace in our land" were the rallying cries for the protests that ultimately ousted Sudan's long-ruling strongman Omar al-Bashir in 2019. The country had been afflicted by a 40-year war with South Sudan, which resulted in South Sudan's secession.
  • Zimbabwe: Bulawayo Water Crisis - When Taps Run Dry and City Runs Out of Ideas
    [IPS] Bulawayo, Zimbabwe -- Dotted across the Zimbabwean city of Bulawayo, the water tanks installed in private residences is evidence that years of a water crisis, that has seen some suburbs here going for months without running water, has not spared anyone. The large plastic drums, locally called Jojo tanks after the company that manufacturers them, and which have a storage range of up to 10,000 litres, have assumed a class status of sorts in Bulawayo.
  • Nigeria: ICC Elections - African Bar Association Insists On Nigerian Judge, Others
    [Premium Times] The African Bar Association (AFBA) has warned against the stalling of the election of Ishaq Bello, the Chief Judge of the Federal Capital Territory, into the bench of the International Court of Justice (ICC).


U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Wednesday blasted China's policy on lending to African countries, reiterating Washington's charges that it creates unsustainable debt burdens.



China's President Xi Jinping indicated in a speech at a China-Africa summit last week that Chinese financial institutions should consult with African countries to work out arrangements for loans with sovereign guarantees, Fitch Ratings said in a report earlier on Wednesday. Xi also told the summit that Beijing would exempt some African countries from repaying zero-interest rate loans due at the end of 2020 and that it was willing to give priority to African countries once COVID-19 vaccines were ready for use.



Pompeo, a persistent critic of China, accused Beijing of "more empty promises and tired platitudes." In a statement, Pompeo said Xi had failed to promise real transparency and accountability for China's role in "unleashing" the novel coronavirus, which began in China, and charged that Beijing was creating "an unsustainable debt burden" in Africa.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo gives news conference in WashingtonPompeo US Secretary of State

Noting that China was "by far the largest bilateral creditor to African governments," Pompeo said most U.S. foreign assistance was made in the form of grants rather than loans, "to promote transparent, private sector-led economic growth that benefits all parties." Fitch said China's pledge to relieve the debt burden owed to it by some emerging-market governments could ease near-term liquidity pressures in nations struggling with the fallout from the coronavirus pandemic.



It said Kenya, the Maldives, Ethiopia, Cameroon, Pakistan, Angola, Laos, Mozambique, Congo and Zambia were among the countries with a significant share of their debt owed to China and eligible for relief. Beijing has committed to participation in the Group of 20 major nations' (G20) debt service suspension initiative (DSSI), which temporarily suspends debt repayments for 77 developing nations falling due between May and December


U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo accused the United Nations Human Rights Council of hypocrisy on Saturday after the organization condemned racism and police brutality in the United States following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis last month.



Pompeo said the 47-member-state forum's unanimous resolution on Friday on policing and race was a new low for the Council and reaffirmed the United States' decision to withdraw from the organization in 2018. "The United Nations Human Rights Council, now comprised of Venezuela and recently, Cuba and China, has long been and remains a haven for dictators and democracies that indulge them," Pompeo said in a statement. "It is a grave disappointment to those genuinely seeking to advance human dignity."





The death of Floyd, a 46-year old Black man who died on May 25 after a white Minneapolis police officer kneeled on his neck for nearly nine minutes, has led to widespread demonstrations in the United States and across the globe against police brutality and racial injustice. Pompeo said the civil discourse was a sign of the United States' democracy, strength and maturity. "If the Council were serious about protecting human rights, there are plenty of legitimate needs for its attention, such as the systemic racial disparities in places like Cuba, China, and Iran," he said.




"If the Council were honest, it would recognize the strengths of American democracy and urge authoritarian regimes around the world to model American democracy and to hold their nations to the same high standards of accountability and transparency that we Americans apply to ourselves."  The resolution adopted by the Human Rights Council was brought by African countries. Floyd's brother, Philonise Floyd had urged the Council to investigate U.S. police brutality and racial discrimination.

 

 

 

(Reporting By Lucia Mutikani; editing by Diane Craft)

The Lloyd's of London insurance market has apologised for its "shameful" role in the 18th and 19th Century Atlantic slave trade and pledged to fund opportunities for black and ethnic minority groups.



About 17 million African men, women and children were torn from their homes and shackled into one of the world's most brutal globalised trades between the 15th and 19th centuries. Many died in merciless conditions. "We are sorry for the role played by the Lloyd’s market in the 18th and 19th Century slave trade - an appalling and shameful period of English history, as well as our own," Lloyd's said in a statement on Thursday.



"Recent events have shone a spotlight on the inequality that black people have experienced over many years as a result of systematic and structural racism that has existed in many aspects of society and unleashed difficult conversations that were long overdue," it added.The world's leading commercial insurance market, Lloyd’s - which started life in Edward Lloyd’s coffee house in 1688 - is where complex insurance contracts ranging from catastrophe to events cancellation are agreed and underwritten.




Lloyd's grew to dominate the shipping insurance market, a key element of Europe's global scramble for empire, treasure and slaves, who were usually in the 18th Century included in insurance policies in the general rate for ship cargo. Weapons and gunpowder from Europe were swapped for African slaves who were shipped across the Atlantic to the Americas.




Those who survived endured a life of subjugation on plantations, while the ships returned to Europe laden with sugar, cotton and tobacco. Although Britain abolished the trans-Atlantic slave trade in 1807, full abolition did not follow for another generation. Lloyd's said it would invest in programmes to attract black and minority ethnic talent, review its artefacts to ensure they were not racist and support charities and organisations promoting opportunity for black and minority ethnic people.


Two top UK companies, including insurance giant Lloyd's of London ...

'INEXCUSABLE'


A sweeping global reassessment of history and racism has been triggered by the May 25 death of George Floyd, a black man who died after a Minneapolis police officer knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes while detaining him. An Oxford University college said on Wednesday it wanted to remove a statue of 19th century colonialist Cecil Rhodes that has been a target of anti-racism protests.




And Greene King, which describes itself as Britain's leading pub owner and brewer, apologised for the profit one of its original founders made from the slave trade. "It is inexcusable that one of our founders profited from slavery and argued against its abolition in the 1800s," Green King's chief executive Nick Mackenzie said.




Green King would make investments to help the black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) community and to support race diversity in its business, Mackenzie added. The history of several other British financial firms, including Barclays is also under fresh scrutiny. The bank was named after David Barclay, a Quaker who campaigned actively against slavery in the late 18th century, but it later acquired institutions with links to the slave trade, including Colonial Bank in 1918 and Martins Bank in 1969.






"We can’t change what’s gone before us, only how we go forward," a Barclays spokesman said.  "We are committed as a bank to do more to further foster our culture of inclusiveness, equality and diversity, for our colleagues, and the customers and clients we serve." The City of London Corporation has launched the Tackling Racism Working Party, which it said will look to promote economic, educational and social inclusion in the City of London and assess the future of statues and monuments.

 

 

 

(Writing by Guy Faulconbridge; Additional reporting by Sinead Cruise and Huw Jones; Editing by William Schomberg, Edmund Blair and Alexander Smith)

Thursday, 11 June 2020 16:09

POEM - The Earth of George Floyd

The  Earth of George Floyd
By Emeka Chiakwelu



There was a simmering travelling moon
Emitting light eclipsed by rapacious scene
Enveloping darkness fell in the land
That’s was the journey in the alien land
But the journey did not start today
Nor was it yesterday, it has been 400 years 
To be precise, the bondage in New World started in 1619
Where meandering water became violent waves
Disfigured fingers, toes were ingrained in the unforgiving soil
Both hands and legs were shackled with chains
Rain resisted, wind resisted
Chains on black body became anathema of bondage




There was a paradise in Africa
Lustrous green vegetation with beautiful scenery
There they came and took him into captivity
Sailed black body to a devouring environment
While soul was in the motherland, Black body was in the cotton field 
There in new place, he was made a slave
This was no simple compulsive labor
This was the chattel slavery at crust of the land
In sweltering heat he picked cotton



He was not born to be slave
He was a noble man in the land of his fathers
A royal blood flow in his veins
But today he became a slave
His history was deleted
His original name was abolished
There they said was freedom
Liberty was said to be freedom
Freedom where were you?
Liberty where were you?



Cried for freedom!
Cried for liberty!
As 400 years of hatred laid on his neck
Crying and weeping for liberty!
He cried with a dying, suffocating voice….
I can’t breathe
I can’t breathe
I can’t breathe
That was his life in the New World


 


Pope Francis said Wednesday that he is praying for the soul of George Floyd and all victims of racism, adding that nothing is gained by violence.



“Dear brothers and sisters in the United States, I have witnessed with great concern the disturbing social unrest in your nation in these past days, following the tragic death of Mr George Floyd,” Pope Francis said in a video broadcast June 3. “We cannot tolerate or turn a blind eye to racism and exclusion in any form and yet claim to defend the sacredness of every human life. At the same time, we have to recognize that the violence of recent nights is self-destructive and self-defeating. Nothing is gained by violence and so much is lost,” the pope said.




Pope Francis said Wednesday that he is praying for the soul of George Floyd and all victims of racism, adding that nothing is gained by violence. “Dear brothers and sisters in the United States, I have witnessed with great concern the disturbing social unrest in your nation in these past days, following the tragic death of Mr George Floyd,” Pope Francis said in a video broadcast June 3.


“We cannot tolerate or turn a blind eye to racism and exclusion in any form and yet claim to defend the sacredness of every human life. At the same time, we have to recognize that the violence of recent nights is self-destructive and self-defeating. Nothing is gained by violence and so much is lost,” the pope said.

 

Catholic News Agency

Ghanaian President Nana  Akufo-Addo  has issued a press  release on the death of  George Floyd in America.  In a  Twitter/Facebook post, President Akufo-Addo wrote, "It cannot be right that, in the 21st century, the United States, this great bastion of democracy, continues to grapple with the problem of systemic racism."

President Nana Addo continues,  “We stand with our kith and kin in America in these difficult and trying times, and we hope that the unfortunate, tragic death of George Floyd will inspire a lasting change in how America confronts head on the problems of hate and racism.”

 

See below

 

Statement of the Chairperson following the murder of George Floyd in the USA

African Union | GLOBAL AFRICA MEDIA


29 May 2020, Addis Ababa: The Chairperson of the African Union Commission Moussa Faki Mahamat strongly condemns the murder of George Floyd that occurred in the United States of America at the hands of law enforcement officers, and wishes to extend his deepest condolences to his family and loved ones.



Recalling the historic Organisation of Africa Unity (OAU) Resolution on Racial Discrimination in the United States of America made by African Heads of State and Government, at the OAU’s First Assembly Meeting held in Cairo, Egypt from 17 to 24 July 1964, the Chairperson of the African Union Commission firmly reaffirms and reiterates the African Union’s rejection of the continuing discriminatory practices against Black citizens of the United States of America.



He further urges the authorities in the United States of America to intensify their efforts to ensure the total elimination of all forms of discrimination based on race or ethnic origin.



Issued by:
The Spokesperson of the Chairperson of the Commission
Ebba Kalondo
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
+251911510512

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